Author Topic: Painting eyes  (Read 1905 times)

Sjeng

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Painting eyes
« on: April 26, 2013, 06:07:07 AM »
as a friend once taught me :)

Quote from: tasoe
My way of doing the eyes is this:

1. Prime the model (obviously)
2. Paint white areas were the eyes seem to be, in most models it's easy to tell, in this one however this was not the case.
3. Paint black around the eyes and trying to create the outline that is to become later. this is the most important step I think and requires the most accuracy. if the eyes are not equal size/same shape, I just repeat the process from step 2 trying to get it right.
4. Paint black inside the eyes in vertical strokes. if the eyes are a different colour, it will cover some part of the outline above and below the eye. Just repeat step three to fix that.
5. Paint the skin colour around the eye, trying to leave a thin black outline. this is also very difficult and requires steady hand and precision.
6. Paint the rest of the face with the skin colour and trying to steer off the eyes because any bad stroke over them will destroy everything.

7 (not in picture). never try to fix or repair anything in the eye area. I always mess it up. Every step has to be perfect otherwise I don't move on to the next one.

I use this method because white is very difficult to cover over black and that's why it has to go first on the figure.
I think the eyes are one of the most important thing on a figure and if they turn out nice, the whole model is very nice as well.

For zombies or other monsters you can also simply paint the eyes red or yellow, with or without a pupil.
Myth Captain backer, HeroQuest fan, Zombicide fan, Mice & Mystics lover, miniature enthousiast.

FeelNFine

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Re: Painting eyes
« Reply #1 on: April 26, 2013, 01:03:36 PM »
This is great, I'm sure I'll use it, becuase even if it's a small detail if the eyes aren't right, it bugs me.
I can't wait for this signature to be filled with links to gameplay variants.

Beefcake

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Re: Painting eyes
« Reply #2 on: April 26, 2013, 01:57:59 PM »
Another way to quickly paint eyes is to paint a larger black dot in the eye cavity and then paint a single smaller white dot on one side (the same side) of each black dot. It makes it look like it is looking sideways but you don't get any cross eyed look from the difficulty of placing single black dots in the middle of an eye. I'll see if I can find a pic of one of my minis to show what I mean

ced1106

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Re: Painting eyes
« Reply #3 on: April 26, 2013, 07:54:41 PM »
Eyes are big PITA. :D

Learn as many techniques as you can. The main "problem" about eyes is that different sculptors will sculpt their eyes differently!!! Some will be easy bulging eyes, others will only be sockets.

I tried the technique sjeng posted on some HeroQuest orcs (red socket, no pupil), but with white glazes and paint instead of the face basecoat, after zenithal priming. This allows me to highlight the face and use the white paint for other parts of the miniature that didn't get enough white primer. I will then apply glazes to preserve the highlights and shades already on the model.

I will experiment with something similar to Beefcake. Paint the eye socket black, then paint the "sides" of the socket white, leaving a pupil by default. The resulting pupil is supposed to look more natural than the mistakes that happen too often when painting in a pupil. I hate mistakes! :D
See HandCannon tutorial: http://handcannononline.com/blog/2012/03/30/video-tutorial-painting-eyes-hair-and-make-up/#more-7756

Finally, get a set of 005 Micron pens! They're useful for dotting in eyes. You can also add shades to tiny details (eg. sword runes) by swiping the ink near the detail then massaging in the ink with a damp brush.